When Protective Orders Are Not Enough – Keeping Clients’ Confidential Information Out Of The Public Record
201605.05
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When Protective Orders Are Not Enough – Keeping Clients’ Confidential Information Out Of The Public Record

In the world of commercial litigation there is an unavoidable complication that often arises during disputes: how to handle sensitive and proprietary information. When parties to business-centered disputes resort to litigation to solve their dispute, the information that is exchanged between the parties often includes sensitive financial material, such as documents, reports, trade secrets, employee…

The Unconscionability Claim/Defense
201604.28
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The Unconscionability Claim/Defense

The claim that a contract is unenforceable because it is unconscionable is more often than not the equivalent of a Hail Mary pass – a long shot that is rarely successful (unless you were Aaron Rodgers facing the Detroit Lions in 2015). Although the Court of Appeals recently affirmed the denial of a summary disposition…

The Tax Man Cometh: Strategies For Retiring Debt
201602.26
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The Tax Man Cometh: Strategies For Retiring Debt

As litigators, we often represent clients being pursued by creditors (banks, private lenders, bankruptcy trustees, etc.) seeking payment on loans or indebtedness. A strategy employed by many lawyers is to simply negotiate a discount on the indebtedness in exchange for immediate payment, with the remainder of the debt being “written off” by the creditor. If…

ECF Service Errors? They Do Happen.
201512.03
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ECF Service Errors? They Do Happen.

One of the largest changes in the practice of law in the last decade is the implementation of electronic court filing, or “ECF,” as practitioners have come to know it. Gone are the days when documents were hand-delivered to the court and counsel by runners and warehoused for years by the court. Now, the filing…

Frustration, Impossibility and Mistake
201512.03
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Frustration, Impossibility and Mistake

In its recently issued opinion in Riewe v. Baron, 2015 Mich App LEXIS 1907 (October 20, 2015), the Michigan Court of Appeals dealt with some recurrent contract defenses that are frequently litigated in the Business Court. The defenses at issue were mutual mistake of fact, frustration of purpose and impossibility of performance, which, if successfully asserted,…

Contracts With Unlicensed Builders – Void or Voidable?
201510.20
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Contracts With Unlicensed Builders – Void or Voidable?

Building or remodeling a home often leads to disputes between homeowners and their builders over the quality of workmanship, cost increases or the timeliness of performance. In those instances, it sometimes turns out that the builder failed to obtain a residential builder’s license, as required by Michigan’s Occupational Code. In such cases, MCL 339.2412(1) of…

Friction or Non-Friction? How to Handle Business Partner Disputes and Other Conflicts
201509.22
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Friction or Non-Friction? How to Handle Business Partner Disputes and Other Conflicts

While business is flourishing across resurgent metro markets nationwide, change invariably brings with it a certain degree of turmoil. From minor growing pains to more profound professional conflicts, some companies are more equipped to handle success, and challenges, than others. When it comes to setting up business partnerships or handling business partner disputes, it is…

In Pursuit of a More Perfect Forum Selection Clause
201507.27
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In Pursuit of a More Perfect Forum Selection Clause

Attorneys who draft contracts regularly insert forum selection clauses into them that require the parties to litigate their disputes in certain locations. Attorneys who litigate breach of contract claims regularly turn to those clauses before filing suit to determine the proper venue in which to file their claims. But a word to the wise –…

Is the “Discovery Rule” Dead?
201507.16
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Is the “Discovery Rule” Dead?

A prospective client tells you he invented a new technology and entered into a licensing agreement with a company that wished to commercially exploit the technology. Shortly after signing the licensing agreement, the licensee set up a foreign company that immediately started manufacturing and selling products using your prospective client’s proprietary technology in violation of…